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Welcome to Historic Voices Podcast: Global History and Culture. Learn from the past through voices that made history. The podcast brings voices from the past that make history alive through their personal accounts, public speeches, and entertainment programs.  The voices are of political leaders, common citizens who lived during extraordinary times, and entertainers who helped Americans live through difficult times.  I provide a short introduction to the recording and another at the end to provide historical context.

This podcast is part of the LifePodcast Network composed of family-friendly podcasts that bring a positive message of hope and inspiration. Check out the LifePodcast Network by clicking on this link, http://lifepodcast.net.  Let me know what speakers you would like to hear in the future and I will work to find the recordings.  I am a professor of history at the University of Minnesota.  Check out my personal website at http://arendale.org to learn more about me.

This podcast is available through the following podcast directories and apps: iTunes, Libsyn, Stitcher, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Google Play, Castbox.fm,Player FM, Overcast, Spotify, Pocket Casts, iCatcher, RSSRadio, and Castamatic. It is available through the following websites: Arendale.org and the HistoricVoicesPodcast Facebook page. Follow our Twitter account, @historicvoices  

Please post comments to the individual episodes, post to the iTunes podcast review and rating section, and email to me. Thanks for listening, David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu 

Jul 24, 2017

Neil Alden Armstrong (August 5, 1930 – August 25, 2012) was an American astronaut, engineer, and the first person to walk on the Moon. He was also an aerospace engineer, naval aviator, test pilot, and university professor. Before becoming an astronaut, Armstrong was an officer in the U.S. Navy and served in the Korean War. After the war, he earned his bachelor's degree at Purdue University and served as a test pilot at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) High-Speed Flight Station, where he logged over 900 flights. He later completed graduate studies at the University of Southern California.

A participant in the U.S. Air Force's Man in Space Soonest and X-20 Dyna-Soar human spaceflight programs, Armstrong joined the NASA Astronaut Corps in 1962. He made his first space flight as command pilot of Gemini 8 in March 1966, becoming NASA's first civilian astronaut to fly in space. He performed the first docking of two spacecraft, with pilot David Scott. This mission was aborted after Armstrong used some of his reentry control fuel to prevent a dangerous spin caused by a stuck thruster, in the first in-flight space emergency.